Connect with us

Satoshi Nakamoto

People claiming to be Satoshi (List of Faketoshis)

DISCLOSURE: I don’t believe any of these people to be Satoshi.

Published

on

The following content was written by xtraelv on April 27, 2020, 01:14:18 AM in the thread People claiming to be Satoshi (List of Faketoshis). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


DISCLOSURE: I don’t believe any of these people to be Satoshi.



Debo Jurgen Etienne Guido – Belgium – (Copyrighted whitepaper)
Ronald Keala Kua Maria – Hawaii – Claims to be Satoshi but curiously trademarked “Bitcoin Cash”
Jörg Molt – Germany
Craig Steven Wright – Australia / United Kingdom (Copyrighted whitepaper & claims copyright over the bitcoin database)
Bilal Khalid(AKA James Caan ) – Pakistan / United Kingdom
Phil Wilson (aka Scronty) – New Zealand

These are people that have publicly stated that they are Satoshi Nakamoto. Other than Phil Wilson who claims to have worked with Craig Wright all of them claim to have worked independent of each other.

This all started on twitter where a conversation between Arthur van Pelt, Pete Myers and Adam Back came up with a brilliant suggestion:

Quote
They have all called each other frauds.

I would love to see a head to head debate between them chaired by
@adam3us



Have I left off any notable claimants from my list ?

Any suggestions on who should be hosting the event ?

The following content was written by xtraelv on April 27, 2020, 01:32:08 AM in the thread People claiming to be Satoshi (List of Faketoshis). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)






Jörg Molt was quickly called out by his ex wife and Andreas Antonopoulos


Craig Steven Wright is discussed here

Debo Jurgen Etienne Guido discussed here

Bilal Khalid(AKA James Caan ) discussed here

Phil Wilson discussed here

Ronald Keala Kua Maria discussed here

The following content was written by Mbitr on April 28, 2020, 07:51:53 AM in the thread People claiming to be Satoshi (List of Faketoshis). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Love the idea of this thread, an all in on collation of faketoshis  Smiley
I don’t want to spam  up your thread , but I’ve been interested in this myself and found the US copyright website

https://cocatalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?Search_Arg=Bitcoin%3A+A+Peer-to-Peer+Electronic+Cash+System&Search_Code=TALL&PID=oyefnTa_Nuq7akCTyLQ_8zn7xtCh&SEQ=20200106132453&CNT=25&HIST=1



There appears to be 6 applications in for the whitepaper, so I can only assume that these people of claiming to be Satoshi ?

2 – applications are from Guido
1 – from CSW
1- appears to be from Ronald Keala Kua Maria
1 – from Wei Liu ?
1 – from Arthur van Pelt ?

All details are on the website and apologies if I am spamming  Smiley


The following content was written by xtraelv on April 29, 2020, 06:04:30 AM in the thread People claiming to be Satoshi (List of Faketoshis). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Love the idea of this thread, an all in on collation of faketoshis  Smiley
I don’t want to spam  up your thread , but I’ve been interested in this myself and found the US copyright website

https://cocatalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?Search_Arg=Bitcoin%3A+A+Peer-to-Peer+Electronic+Cash+System&Search_Code=TALL&PID=oyefnTa_Nuq7akCTyLQ_8zn7xtCh&SEQ=20200106132453&CNT=25&HIST=1



There appears to be 6 applications in for the whitepaper, so I can only assume that these people of claiming to be Satoshi ?

2 – applications are from Guido
1 – from CSW
1- appears to be from Ronald Keala Kua Maria
1 – from Wei Liu ?
1 – from Arthur van Pelt ?

All details are on the website and apologies if I am spamming  Smiley



Wei Liu and Arthur Van Pelt both registered the copyright to demonstrate how easy it is to lodge a copyright. They both claim “we are all Satoshi” rather than that they wrote the whitepaper.

https://www.coindesk.com/everyone-can-be-satoshi-wei-liu-on-contesting-craig-wrights-copyright

Quote
Liu is a crypto entrepreneur from China and said his goal in registering the document was to point out that copyright is technically meaningless in this context. To be clear, Liu chose not to answer whether or not he is Satoshi Nakamoto when asked by CoinDesk.

He said:

“I filed it just to let people know anyone can register a copyright. Everyone can be Satoshi Nakamoto.”










The following content was written by xtraelv on August 21, 2020, 01:35:21 PM in the thread People claiming to be Satoshi (List of Faketoshis). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Latest amusement in the Faketoshi dramas:



Jurgen Debo battling it out with James Caan.
https://twitter.com/CaanKhalid/status/1296422143618617344


Looks like Satoshi needs $50


The following content was written by xtraelv on December 11, 2020, 06:19:33 AM in the thread People claiming to be Satoshi (List of Faketoshis). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Another Faketoshi for the list.

Lance the Bali “Satoshi” (originally from Texas).

https://news.bitcoin.com/next-satoshi-nakamoto-revealed-himself-bali/

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Satoshi Nakamoto

Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?

I mean an image. You know a nice one that people can put on their checkout webpages.

Published

on

The following content was written by mtgox on July 21, 2010, 08:48:44 PM in the thread Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


I mean an image. You know a nice one that people can put on their checkout webpages.

The following content was written by jgarzik on July 21, 2010, 09:01:11 PM in the thread Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


More than just an image…

Even though the bitcoin network itself handles fundamental transaction processing, web shopping carts will need additional amounts of payment processing to match purchases to incoming payments, be notified when a payment is processed (currently bitcoin purchase can take multiple hours to be confirmed), though order fulfillment and completion.

Even a simple “donate” button will require some sort of payment processing gadgetry a la Paypal’s web button engine, if you want people to provide names and/or messages along with their donation.

It’s tempting to code up a button engine myself, actually…

The following content was written by mtgox on July 21, 2010, 09:14:07 PM in the thread Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Yeah I know. I’m 90% done with the code part of it. Just seeing if someone had already made a button image before breaking out photoshop.

So wait to code yours since hopefully you can just use mine 🙂

Continue Reading

Satoshi Nakamoto

On bitcoin generation, and bitcoin organizations

Bitcoin is a currency, literally, in its infancy. The concept is, as far as I know, the first of its kind.

Published

on

The following content was written by jgarzik on February 20, 2011, 06:44:53 AM in the thread Pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Can someone please give me a list of the pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction? It seems very inconvenient to use a new address each time.

warning, I am a newbie…liked the videos presentations, did some research…and tried it.  Bitcoin.exe on an i7 –only application—24/7 x 10 days—on generate mode.  Only successful in the gratuitous .05 BTC from faucet per computer per public ip address.  I had plans to accept Bitcoins on all my websites…hired web developers  …faced ZERO SUPPORT ANYWHERE.

Bitcoin definitely needs to grow some organizations that can offer technical advice and software support for bitcoin itself.  Most major open source projects have one or more companies doing this.  That would help with bitcoin adoption, too.

Quote
So question number ONE.  What happens to the Bitcoin if I don’t use it, save it?  I speculate it ONLY serves to increase the value of those users and optimists who are “fan boys”.  I have spent too much time…wasting…which cost me more money than I could have possibly made  in two weeks.

Bitcoin is a currency, literally, in its infancy.  The concept (distributed notary service with digital signatures) is, as far as I know, the first of its kind.  It is still being “bootstrapped,” meaning that bitcoin does not have a self-supporting economy — which must, by its nature, encompass mundane things like buying gasoline with BTC, paying rent or mortgage with BTC, buying groceries with BTC.

So, what can you do with the bitcoins you have right now?  Not a lot, if you ignore bootstrapping services (services like currency exchanges or bitcointo.com).  Mostly software services like web hosting, and an odd assortment of tangible goods.

But it seems like most folks in the bitcoin community recognize that we just started construction of a very interesting and unique experiment in currency.  Any endeavour is, unfortunately, very high risk from an investment standpoint.  It might fail for dozens of reasons…  but wouldn’t be fun and interesting if it succeeded?

Quote
Question Number Two.  My PC’s were set up by my SYSADMIN’s.  After a few bouts of “actvity”….I ended up with 100% CPU on all cores…and the “connect” prompt  says unconnected.  Thats a lot of power and CPU cycles for Nothing…a big fat waste of time.  You want me to be impressed so we can get the concept moving?  Put up simple to understand “NOOB” isms…so that morons like myself…can learn HOW to connect.  If no connect…why the 100% CPU on all cores and NOTHING going on?  FOR DAYS?  I don’t have time for games.  When you guys are serious…I’ll be back.   I love all the concepts supporting it…but I will not GIVE AWAY valuable product from my websites for coins that have no value TO ME.

Step 1: Turn off “Generate coins” option.  It is a waste of time and electricity.

Step 2: Wait for all the blocks to download.  As of this writing, there are 109245 of them.

Step 3: Don’t panic, and read the forums.  If you can post specific problems you are seeing after following steps #1 and #2, you can get answers.

Step 4: Hire better SYSADMIN’s.  They should be able to answer these basic questions and offer basic support, or not install software that neither you or they understand.


Continue Reading

Satoshi Nakamoto

How many bitcoin addresses exist?

The larger the hash160 is, the more base58 characters required to represent its address.

Published

on

The following content was written by davux on November 10, 2010, 10:21:15 PM in the thread Pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


It’s not. It’s 62^33, which is slightly over 10^59.
How did you arrive to this result?

An address has 33 significant characters, each of which has 62 possible values (10 numbers, 26 uppercase letters, 26 lowercase).
So you have 62 * 62 * … * 62 possibilities (33 times).

Actually, now that I remember, it’s 58 (uppercase i and lowercase L are not included because they look too similar, same for zero and uppercase o).

So there are 58^33 possibles values, which is slightly more than 10^58. Still high, but not quite as high as 10^92.

The following content was written by theymos on November 10, 2010, 10:40:57 PM in the thread Pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


An address has 33 significant characters, each of which has 62 possible values (10 numbers, 26 uppercase letters, 26 lowercase).
So you have 62 * 62 * … * 62 possibilities (33 times).

Actually, now that I remember, it’s 58 (uppercase i and lowercase L are not included because they look too similar, same for zero and uppercase o).

So there are 58^33 possibles values, which is slightly more than 10^58. Still high, but not quite as high as 10^92.

As ByteCoin already explained earlier in the topic, an address contains a non-data check code and version number. There are actually “only” 160 bits of randomness in each address: 2^160, or 1.46×10^48 possible addresses.

Addresses can also be 25-34 characters in length, depending on how numerically large the hash160+check code is (the larger it is, the more base58 characters required).

Continue Reading

Trending