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Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based)

Tested with Python 2.6, pbkdf2_rmd v0.1 (Python module), pywallet V1.1

binary numbers on computer screen matrix background

Editor’s note: some posts were deleted by the author from the original thread and have been reconstructed from archives. As a result, some bitcointalk archive links are not available.

The following content was written by Ukigo on July 15, 2011, 1:50:13 PM in the thread Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post.


Hello everyone !

It’s here:

UPD: see next post for new version (probably more secure).

Pbwhatkey takes 3 parameters:

./ Pbwhatkey your_passphrase your_salt number_of_iterations

Generates a secret key from this input script and then displays it and the corresponding Bitcoin address.

Installation:
1) Install pbwhatkey (see post below)
2) Download pywallet from https://github.com/joric/pywallet version 1.1 (won’t work with V 1.0)
Place pywallet.py in the same directory
Run it: ./ pb4 Korsaar over9000 66666
or: python PB4 Korsaar over9000 66666
The output should be:

The secret key to import: 5JPX6aZBM9NpVdRza6eYnJ1ofB76YL6bennLcZpBq6rB5mbvEYa

the Bitcoin address: 1PQKsnY7N4jQhfRTgKx4j3xLkscYkm4fLS

third parameter should be large enough, can be above 1,000,000 iterations.
(Tested up to 2,200,000)

Password and salt can be UTF-8 encoded (although not tested yet)

Tested with Python 2.6, pbkdf2_rmd v 0.1 (Python module), pywallet V 1.1

Any thoughts or suggestions?

The following content was written by Ukigo on July 16, 2011, 9:51:41 AM in the thread Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post.


You will need a slightly modified PBKDF2 Python module. Save the code below as “pbkdf2_rmd.py” in the same directory with the above “PB3” script.

https://gist.github.com/ZenulAbidin/cfb978dc47814195fe68358778de00fe  Editor’s note: link reuploaded

The following content was written by samr7 on July 19, 2011, 12:10:05 PM in the thread Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


This program would appear to work exactly as advertised.  It produces good, repeatable public/private key pairs out of passwords using a standard, well-regarded algorithm.  Kudos on moving to Python, it’s so easy to read the code, and the base58 functions are elegant and understandable!

In any case, memorizing a 51-character private key is unwieldy, but I’ll argue that a strong password of comparable security can be a little over half as long and much easier to memorize.  Which, besides backup, would be really great in low-tech situations where wallet files and all physical representations of keys can’t be retained.

The following content was written by samr7 on July 19, 2011, 03:53:27 PM in the thread Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


On second thought, there is one detail about this program that worries me.

It sets up the PBKDF2 function and reads out 16 bytes as a hexadecimal-encoded string.

Code:
    topsec = PBKDF2_RMD(hashlib.sha512(sys.argv[1]).hexdigest(), salt, int(sys.argv[3])).hexread(16)

Then it passes the string to the pywallet integer converter.  I think what you meant to do with this is read 32 bytes of unencoded data from the PBKDF2 function:

Code:
    topsec = PBKDF2_RMD(hashlib.sha512(sys.argv[1]).hexdigest(), salt, int(sys.argv[3])).read(32)

and while the next line will no longer be able to print the raw private key without a str.encode(‘hex’), the str_to_long will at least get the full key data.  As it stands now, it looks like it’s using the ASCII hexadecimal string as the raw private key, which would provide about half the expected level of security.

The following content was written by samr7 on July 20, 2011, 04:48:59 AM in the thread Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


As i understand this :
“topsec” is NOT a private key itself, but a “secret multiplier” using to construct  private key.
 See pywallet source code.

It’s true that the topsec isn’t the same thing as a pywallet Private_key.  However, an EC private key is just a large integer between 0 and the group order, and one would assume your intention is to use topsec as this value.

Indeed the secret and secret_multiplier from the pywallet code is exactly the EC private key.  The act of multiplying the generator (point) by secret (integer) produces the EC public key (point).

Quote
I’m not sure how many digits secret multiplier must have ?!

It’s 32 bytes long.  The largest useful value is one less than: 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEBAAEDCE6AF48A03BBFD25E8CD0364141

BTW, new version looks a lot better!

The following content was written by etotheipi on August 25, 2011, 11:21:55 PM in the thread Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


So I’m reviving an old thread here, but I’m interested in a slightly different application of deterministic key generation.  It seems like something that could integrated with pywallet very easily.  I’m sure I’m not the first person to suggest this, but I’m not finding other threads about it.

Rather than using passwords to deterministically generate your key, I’d like to use a random number generator to create a 256-bit Private-Key-Generator once.  This generator would be the first private key, GenKey, and then you get a semi-infinite sequence of new keys by simply following:

Code:
PrivKey[i+1] = hash256( GenKey XOR PrivKey[i] );

You wouldn’t need the key stretching (at least that’s what I’m assuming the iterations are for in the PBKDF2 module), because you’re using full entropy in your original key.  Using this technique, you only need to backup your wallet once.  Sure, it links all your addresses together, but 99% of the time with the current wallet, if the attacker gets one key, he gets all of them, anyway.  And by using GenKey in each iteration, even if attacker gets PrivKey(i), he cannot determine any of the other keys.  My primary motivation is that I want to be able to put my GenKey into a QR code and store it in a safe-deposit box, and then I never have to worry about losing my private keys.  

With the current wallet, I only get a pool of 100 keys, and have to re-backup my wallet every time I run out.

The following content was written by etotheipi on August 26, 2011, 04:51:57 AM in the thread Pbwhatkey — deterministic private key generator (PBKDF2 & pywallet.py based). All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Yes, it is a deterministic wallet.  In hindsight I realize is not precisely the purpose of this original post, but it is related.  Pywallet is the perfect tool for enabling this technique.  The command line interface would look like:

   
Code:
./pywallet.py –create-deterministic-wallet –generator-key=random256bit.bin –numkeys 10000 -o wallet.dat

This would calculate the first 10,000 keys based on the generator, and add them to key pool in wallet.dat.  If you run out of keys, you can re-run with a higher number, and it will add the new keys to it.  Perhaps it could eventually be included in the client so you never have to run anything:  just create your generator-key once, back it up, and the client will create endless keys from it.

You don’t have to be snarky about the idea… it’s simply a suggestion and you guys are a very short way from having this enabled using pywallet.py.  If you don’t like it, let’s have a discussion about what problems it might have and how they could be resolved.

Also, I don’t know why you would question the security of safe-deposit boxes, but that wasn’t the point at all.  People want to be able to backup their wallet once and know that they always have a backup somewhere they consider safe in case their hard-drive fails.  With the current wallets, they have to backup every 100 transactions.  Additionally, there is no warning when their key pool is exhausted, so there’s a risk of using non-backed-up keys without realizing it.  This deterministic wallet solves a lot of problems, and I don’t see where the reduced security is.




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