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Satoshi Nakamoto

Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?

I mean an image. You know a nice one that people can put on their checkout webpages.

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The following content was written by mtgox on July 21, 2010, 08:48:44 PM in the thread Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


I mean an image. You know a nice one that people can put on their checkout webpages.

The following content was written by jgarzik on July 21, 2010, 09:01:11 PM in the thread Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


More than just an image…

Even though the bitcoin network itself handles fundamental transaction processing, web shopping carts will need additional amounts of payment processing to match purchases to incoming payments, be notified when a payment is processed (currently bitcoin purchase can take multiple hours to be confirmed), though order fulfillment and completion.

Even a simple “donate” button will require some sort of payment processing gadgetry a la Paypal’s web button engine, if you want people to provide names and/or messages along with their donation.

It’s tempting to code up a button engine myself, actually…

The following content was written by mtgox on July 21, 2010, 09:14:07 PM in the thread Has someone made a “buy with bitcoins” button?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Yeah I know. I’m 90% done with the code part of it. Just seeing if someone had already made a button image before breaking out photoshop.

So wait to code yours since hopefully you can just use mine 🙂
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Satoshi Nakamoto

On bitcoin generation, and bitcoin organizations

Bitcoin is a currency, literally, in its infancy. The concept is, as far as I know, the first of its kind.

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The following content was written by jgarzik on February 20, 2011, 06:44:53 AM in the thread Pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Can someone please give me a list of the pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction? It seems very inconvenient to use a new address each time.

warning, I am a newbie…liked the videos presentations, did some research…and tried it.  Bitcoin.exe on an i7 –only application—24/7 x 10 days—on generate mode.  Only successful in the gratuitous .05 BTC from faucet per computer per public ip address.  I had plans to accept Bitcoins on all my websites…hired web developers  …faced ZERO SUPPORT ANYWHERE.

Bitcoin definitely needs to grow some organizations that can offer technical advice and software support for bitcoin itself.  Most major open source projects have one or more companies doing this.  That would help with bitcoin adoption, too.

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So question number ONE.  What happens to the Bitcoin if I don’t use it, save it?  I speculate it ONLY serves to increase the value of those users and optimists who are “fan boys”.  I have spent too much time…wasting…which cost me more money than I could have possibly made  in two weeks.

Bitcoin is a currency, literally, in its infancy.  The concept (distributed notary service with digital signatures) is, as far as I know, the first of its kind.  It is still being “bootstrapped,” meaning that bitcoin does not have a self-supporting economy — which must, by its nature, encompass mundane things like buying gasoline with BTC, paying rent or mortgage with BTC, buying groceries with BTC.

So, what can you do with the bitcoins you have right now?  Not a lot, if you ignore bootstrapping services (services like currency exchanges or bitcointo.com).  Mostly software services like web hosting, and an odd assortment of tangible goods.

But it seems like most folks in the bitcoin community recognize that we just started construction of a very interesting and unique experiment in currency.  Any endeavour is, unfortunately, very high risk from an investment standpoint.  It might fail for dozens of reasons…  but wouldn’t be fun and interesting if it succeeded?

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Question Number Two.  My PC’s were set up by my SYSADMIN’s.  After a few bouts of “actvity”….I ended up with 100% CPU on all cores…and the “connect” prompt  says unconnected.  Thats a lot of power and CPU cycles for Nothing…a big fat waste of time.  You want me to be impressed so we can get the concept moving?  Put up simple to understand “NOOB” isms…so that morons like myself…can learn HOW to connect.  If no connect…why the 100% CPU on all cores and NOTHING going on?  FOR DAYS?  I don’t have time for games.  When you guys are serious…I’ll be back.   I love all the concepts supporting it…but I will not GIVE AWAY valuable product from my websites for coins that have no value TO ME.

Step 1: Turn off “Generate coins” option.  It is a waste of time and electricity.

Step 2: Wait for all the blocks to download.  As of this writing, there are 109245 of them.

Step 3: Don’t panic, and read the forums.  If you can post specific problems you are seeing after following steps #1 and #2, you can get answers.

Step 4: Hire better SYSADMIN’s.  They should be able to answer these basic questions and offer basic support, or not install software that neither you or they understand.


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Satoshi Nakamoto

How many bitcoin addresses exist?

The larger the hash160 is, the more base58 characters required to represent its address.

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The following content was written by davux on November 10, 2010, 10:21:15 PM in the thread Pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


It’s not. It’s 62^33, which is slightly over 10^59.
How did you arrive to this result?

An address has 33 significant characters, each of which has 62 possible values (10 numbers, 26 uppercase letters, 26 lowercase).
So you have 62 * 62 * … * 62 possibilities (33 times).

Actually, now that I remember, it’s 58 (uppercase i and lowercase L are not included because they look too similar, same for zero and uppercase o).

So there are 58^33 possibles values, which is slightly more than 10^58. Still high, but not quite as high as 10^92.

The following content was written by theymos on November 10, 2010, 10:40:57 PM in the thread Pros and cons of using new Bitcoin addresses for each transaction?. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


An address has 33 significant characters, each of which has 62 possible values (10 numbers, 26 uppercase letters, 26 lowercase).
So you have 62 * 62 * … * 62 possibilities (33 times).

Actually, now that I remember, it’s 58 (uppercase i and lowercase L are not included because they look too similar, same for zero and uppercase o).

So there are 58^33 possibles values, which is slightly more than 10^58. Still high, but not quite as high as 10^92.

As ByteCoin already explained earlier in the topic, an address contains a non-data check code and version number. There are actually “only” 160 bits of randomness in each address: 2^160, or 1.46×10^48 possible addresses.

Addresses can also be 25-34 characters in length, depending on how numerically large the hash160+check code is (the larger it is, the more base58 characters required).
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Satoshi Nakamoto

Node influence proportional to CPU power

What else do you use to determine who is (approximately) one person?

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The following content was written by satoshi on August 07, 2010, 04:28:17 PM in the thread latency and locality. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Once you get away from a system where each node’s influence is proportional to their CPU power, then what else do you use to determine who is (approximately) one person?

The following content was written by knightmb on August 07, 2010, 04:57:42 PM in the thread latency and locality. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Maybe we need a big technical chart that documents every single step about how BitCoin works and the next time someone starts a topic about why everything in bitcoin is done wrong, we can point to that chart and say “here’s how it works, document how your new process will work in detail and we will compare”  Grin

I think that would help to cut down on a lot of assumptions/disputes I see in topics every-time the issue of “this isn’t being done right” comes up in this forum.

Just saying….  Cool

The following content was written by Red on August 07, 2010, 05:15:08 PM in the thread latency and locality. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


The method I was referring to was in the earliest version of Freenet. It was designed before the trusted connections model was implemented. I’d need to review all the details to remember the specifics. But basically you the nodes you would connect to were picked (I forget the method of picking) Then you pick a random number and broadcast it to all those nodes. Each of those nodes picks a random number and broadcasts it back to you, and to the other nodes in the set. All of the numbers are mathematically combined (don’t remember the function) into your arbitrary ID. If you don’t answer to that consensus ID no one with talk to you.

Don’t sue me if I’ve got that wrong. That is from an obviously faulty memory.

The Sybil attack (named after the movie, I think) was a network segmentation attack. You create multiple personalities and try to surround a given node to deduce what they are storing. Obviously, that turned out to be possible for this method of ID generation. Hence the new friend-to-friend topography. The same limitation may be a weakness for bitcoin as well. But failures often provide the best guidance on new ways to proceed.

Forgetting the Freenet tangent for a moment…

The “Proof-of-work” technique may actually be applicable to address the ID generation problem you deftly pointed out. Instead of making it harder to generate the record of transactions, you could make it harder to generate new nodes and attach them to the network.

Suppose you (making this up as I go) required that nodes create a private key, then calculate a proof of work checksum on that key, and then the node ID became RIPE-160(SHA-256(POWCheckum(public key) + SHA-256(public key))). Or some such.

The intention being to slow node ID generation down enough for the attack to be untenable, but not so much that it makes it onerous for new nodes to join.

That combined with some last minute “salt” on the transactions, might get us most of the way there.

——-

By the way, I see what I overlooked in my previous conceptualization.

When a transaction is send to the DHT I was presuming would actually be stored on many (hopefully independent) nodes. 5 times related to each in-point and 5 times related to each out-point. Also once by the payer, and once by the payee. I guess that would be 17X redundant given 1 in and 2 outs.

Each of these places “could” resubmit the transaction back to the network if it went missing.

However, I failed to consider three things, 1) validators would only be using 5 of the 17 places for validation. 2) they have no way to query the other places of redundancy should the initial 5 locations be compromised. 3) the additional redundant places have no way of identifying the compromised nodes if they return targeted malicious lies.

Oops. But nice catch!

The following content was written by Red on August 07, 2010, 06:05:01 PM in the thread latency and locality. All content is owned by the author of the bitcointalk.org post. (original)


Once you get away from a system where each node’s influence is proportional to their CPU power, then what else do you use to determine who is (approximately) one person?

That is the key question of course. I think you need to make it harder to demonstrate you are a person/node. I posted some initial thoughts in the previous post.
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